Writing

Connect Modes of Writing to Author's Purpose

Posted on August 20, 2017

Connect Modes of Writing to Author's Purpose

Posted on August 20, 2017

Connect Modes of Writing to Author's Purpose

Introduce students to the modes of writing in tandem with author's purpose. This shows an important reading--writing connection. Create a foldable with the acronym P.E.N. or P.I.E. to solidify this connection and set a foundation.

At the beginning of each school year, introduce students to the three most common reasons to write--to persuade (P), to inform (I), and to entertain (E). Then explain that throughout the year these reasons for writing will be closely tied to your teaching about the three major modes of writing--persuasive, expository, narrative. (NOTE: Many teachers introduce author's purpose as P.I.E. Make the connection that in writer's workshop, the students are now the authors, and they write for the same three reasons.)

Within this introductory lesson, reveal the differences among the three modes with three texts on the same topic (e.g., turtles). Students better grasp the subtle differences between persuasive and informative when they see the same topic presented in different ways.

P--Save the sea turtle brochure or newspaper article
I--Nonfiction book about the sea turtle
E--Ninja Turtles comic book

During this first mini-lesson, reveal the P.I.E. foldable (or P.E.N. version). This can be used to document the different characteristics, ingredients, facets, etc. of each type. Older students could have an individual foldable for note-taking. Primary teachers could create an extra-large classroom version on chart paper. Another option is to create a bulletin board of examples.

P.E.N. Foldable for Persuasive, Expository, and Narrative Writing

Maintain a P.E.N. foldable that reveals the writing purposes--to persuade/argue, to explain/inform, to narrate a story/share experiences.

P.I.E. Foldable for Author's Purposes To Persuade, To Inform, To Entertain

Maintain a P.I.E. foldable that reveals the writing purposes--to persuade/argue, to inform/explain, to entertain/share experiences.